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What is the symbolism of the glass paper weight in the book 1984?

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❶Download this Lit Guide! As mentioned in the quote, the paperweight is at least a hundred years old.

Glass Paperweight in "1984"

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The original text plus a side-by-side modern translation of every Shakespeare play. LitCharts From the creators of SparkNotes, something better. Download this Lit Guide! The old glass paperweight sold to Winston by Mr. Charrington represents the past. The level of craftsmanship required to make it is no longer achievable, since production standards have dropped and the Party has abolished beauty for its own sake.

The tiny fragment of coral embedded in the paperweight represents the fragility of human relationships, particularly the bond between Julia and Winston, which is destroyed by O'Brien as easily and remorselessly as the paperweight is smashed by the Thought Police. The paperweight also symbolizes the room in Mr. Charrington's house that becomes a private sanctuary for the lovers, imagined by Winston as a separate world, frozen in time.

For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it each theme is indicated by its own dot and icon, like this one: Book 2, Chapter 4 Quotes. He turned over towards the light and lay gazing into the glass paperweight. The inexhaustibly interesting thing was not the fragment of coral but the interior of the glass itself. There was such a depth of it, and yet it was almost as transparent as air.

It was as though the surface of the glass had been the arch of the sky, enclosing a tiny world with its atmosphere complete. He had the feeling that he could get inside it, and that in fact he was inside it, along with the mahogany bed and the gateleg table and the clock and the steel engraving and the paperweight itself.

After being subjected to weeks of this intense treatment, Winston himself comes to the conclusion that nothing is more powerful than physical pain—no emotional loyalty or moral conviction can overcome it. The Party controls every source of information, managing and rewriting the content of all newspapers and histories for its own ends.

The Party does not allow individuals to keep records of their past, such as photographs or documents. As a result, memories become fuzzy and unreliable, and citizens become perfectly willing to believe whatever the Party tells them.

By controlling the present, the Party is able to manipulate the past. And in controlling the past, the Party can justify all of its actions in the present. By means of telescreens and hidden microphones across the city, the Party is able to monitor its members almost all of the time. Additionally, the Party employs complicated mechanisms was written in the era before computers to exert large-scale control on economic production and sources of information, and fearsome machinery to inflict torture upon those it deems enemies.

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George Orwell's novel '' is full of symbolism. In this lesson, we'll examine the significance of one of those symbols, the glass paperweight, and learn what it means to the main character.

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The quotes below all refer to the symbol of The Glass Paperweight. For each quote, you can also see the other characters and themes related to it (each theme is .

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To me, the paperweight is sort of symbolic of Winston's hopes and dreams and of his time together with Julia. Winston buys the paperweight early in the time that he is having the affair with Julia. For example, the use of the glass paperweight in George Orwell’s represents the many aspects of Winston’s rebellion and secret life of the Party, which will be further explained throughout this essay.

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The glass paperweight is an important symbol in George Orwell's These quiz questions will ask you to describe the paperweight and assess its significance to the novel. The glass paperweight defines Winston Smiths undivided fate throughout the novel , by George Orwell. This symbol of the glass paperweight is crucial to Winston's development as a character.